first_imgLuther Burell (L) of England is marked by eandro Leivas of a South American collective team during a friendly rugby match on June 2, 2013 in Montevideo. AFP PHOTO/MIGUEL ROJO (Photo credit should read MIGUEL ROJO/AFP/Getty Images) 1. Alex Corbisiero2. Rob Webber3. David Wilson4. Joe Launchbury5. Dave Attwood6. Tom Wood7. Matt Kvesic8. Ben Morgan9. Richard Wigglesworth10. Freddie Burns11. Christian Wade12. Kyle Eastmond13. Jonathan Joseph14. Jonny May15. Mike BrownCheck out David Flatman’s exclusive column about his experiences touring Argentina in 2002 in the July edition of Rugby World – on sale now! For Stuart Lancaster there is a fork in the road. He could stick with those who landed and performed instantly. He could bring in those he has trusted throughout the Six Nations. He could surprise everyone. He could take trust over form.A few weeks ago David Flatman told Rugby World the team he would like to play Argentina in the Tests. Do you agree with his choices? Should Lancaster? We will find out on Thursday at 2pm.Showman and smasher: Will Luther Burell play Argentina?Flats’ XV: LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The unstoppable force: Billy Vunipola rattled up a hat-trick in 15 minutes against CONSUR. Will he play Argentina?By Alan DymockBLITZING PAST an amalgam of Argentinean, Uruguayan, Chilean and Brazilian players on Saturday, the England team kicked off their South American summer tour in fine style.A hat-trick was registered against the CONSUR XV by Billy Vunipola in less time than it takes to grill a steak, Ben Foden scored an impressive double and England’s pack of cattle were stampeding by the end of the match. It was, for want of a better phrase, straightforward for the tourists in their initial tour game.Now they smash into Salta for the first of two Tests with Argentina. The CONSUR team was made up of top club players in Argentina and internationals from the rest, but it is an almost misleading build-up to matches against the best of the Americas. Argentina will be a much more daunting proposition.This is where it becomes interesting for England because they must balance the ability of conquering a top Test side with their plans to develop talent for years to come. So while players like Stephen Myler, Luther Burrell and Kearnan Myall were favoured for the opener against some amateurs from a top tier nation and internationals from a third tier one, they may not run out for the second week in a row.last_img read more

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 [Anglican Journal] Diocese of Ottawa Bishop John H. Chapman has called for prayers following the shooting on Parliament Hill the morning of Oct. 22. “Like all Canadians, we are following today’s news from Parliament Hill with shock and trepidation,” he said in a statement issued this afternoon.Chapman noted that the shooting took place “just blocks from our synod office.”The shooting began shortly before 10 a.m. when a man who has not yet been identified opened fire on a soldier standing guard at the National War Memorial before hi-jacking a car, driving to the Parliament Buildings and entering the Centre Block. He opened fire again, injuring two security guards, but was shot dead shortly afterwards, reportedly by Parliamentary sergeant-at-arms Kevin Vickers.The soldier who was fatally wounded has been identified as Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, age 24, a reservist from Hamilton, Ont. Chapman urged prayers for the victim, “for all those at the centre of this situation and for a return to calm in our homes, hearts and streets.”He added: “In this moment of huge uncertainty, building lockdowns, evacuated streets, barricaded shopping malls and minute-by-minute updates, we draw strength and courage from our faith and pray that this event will soon be over.”When contacted this morning, the Ottawa diocesan synod office (located about a mile from Parliament Hill) reported being put on lockdown. Michael Herbert, who serves as director of financial ministry at the synod office, told the Anglican Journal that while many people were “going about their business,” police were also stopping and searching vehicles coming down Wellington Street (the main thoroughfare passing Parliament Hill).Those at the synod office were later advised to stay away from windows and doors, and citizens have been told to avoid the downtown core as police search for other suspects, according to Art Babych, editor of the diocesan newspaper, Crosstalk.No one has been taken into custody at this time. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Comments (1) Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Julian Malakar says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canada: Bishop calls for prayers following Parliament Hill shooting Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By André ForgetPosted Oct 23, 2014 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC October 24, 2014 at 4:32 pm These killing sprees by Muslim terrorists around the world are not going to be over soon until truth about Islam be opened to public for awareness and Muslims fight for rectification to live with peace with their non-Muslims neighbors. This morning another Muslim convert hacked two police officers in New York City with an ax. Interestingly all terrorists works are committed by Muslim converts and they are inspired from word of Quran to hate Jews and Christian. On the contrary Christian converts are transformed to love others.In Quran Sura 9:29 says “Fight those who do not believe in Allah or in the Last Day and who do not consider unlawful what Allah and His Messenger have made unlawful and who do not adopt the religion of truth from those who were given the Scripture – [fight] until they give the jizyah willingly while they are humbled”. In another Sura Qur’an 5:51—“O you who believe! do not take the Jews and the Christians for friends; they are friends of each other; and whoever amongst you takes them for a friend, then surely he is one of them; surely Allah does not guide the unjust people”.Teaching of Muslim’s Al-Quran is opposite to teaching of Jesus Christ. Christ teaches us to love enemy but Quran teaches to kill unbelievers.May Almighty God protect us from evil spirt and grant His peace! Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Anglican Communion Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Communiqué: International Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Anglican Communion, Ecumenical & Interreligious Comments (1) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Harry W Shipps says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI September 30, 2015 at 9:55 pm It is so good that this work continues.HarrySavannah, GA Rector Albany, NY The International Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue met in Buffalo, New York, from Sept. 19-25. Photo: ICAOTDInternational Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological DialogueSeptember 2015 CommuniquéBuffalo, New York, United States of AmericaIn the name of the Triune God, and with the blessing and guidance of our Churches, the International Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue (ICAOTD) met in Buffalo, New York, from 19 to 25 September 2015. The Commission is deeply grateful for the generous hospitality extended by the Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Buffalo (Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople).Metropolitan Nicholas of Detroit formally welcomed the Commission to its meeting in his diocese. He offered praise and encouragement for the work of the dialogue. He stressed the urgent need for expressions of Christian unity in light of the deep challenges and crises before the global community, mindful of events unfolding even as the Commission undertook its deliberations.The Commission brought to completion the first section of its work on the theological understanding of the human person, with the adoption of its agreed statement, In the Image and Likeness of God: A Hope-Filled Anthropology. The report, shortly to be published, is the culmination of six years of study on what Anglicans and Orthodox can say together about the meaning of human personhood in the divine image.This agreement lays the foundation for continuing dialogue on ethical decision-making in the light of this vision. At its future meetings the Commission will consider the practical consequences of this theological approach to personhood. The Commission anticipates ongoing study in areas such as bioethics and the sanctity of life, as well as human rights and ecological justice.The meeting commenced with the Hierarchical Divine Liturgy at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church. Commission members also attended an ecumenical celebration of Evensong at St Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral. The Commission was welcomed by Bishop William Franklin of the Diocese of Western New York. In his homily he spoke of the contribution to Christian unity made by a former bishop of the diocese, Charles Henry Brent, who was a leading pioneer in the Faith and Order movement. Daily prayer strengthened and grounded the work accomplished together. Morning and evening prayers were offered, alternating between Anglicans and Orthodox.The fellowship of the Commission was enriched by the warm and gracious reception by parishioners of the Annunciation Church, and their parish priest, the Revd Dr Christos Christakis, who is the Orthodox Co-Secretary of the dialogue. Members of the Commission were introduced to the unique historic, cultural and natural characteristics of the city of Buffalo, Niagara Falls and the surrounding area.The work of the Commission will continue at its next meeting in September 2016, to be hosted by the Anglican Communion.Metropolitan Kallistos of DiokleiaOrthodox Co-ChairmanThe Most Revd Roger HerftAnglican Co-ChairmanRepresentatives of the Orthodox ChurchMetropolitan Kallistos of DiokleiaEcumenical Patriarchate, Co-ChairmanMetropolitan Serafim of ZimbabwePatriarchate of AlexandriaThe Revd Fr Alexander HaigPatriarchate of AntiochThe Revd Dr George DragasPatriarchate of JerusalemThe Revd Dr Valentin VassechkoPatriarchate of MoscowProfessor Dr Bogdan LubardicPatriarchate of SerbiaMetropolitan Nifon of TârgoviştePatriarchate of RomaniaMetropolitan Chrysostomos of KitionChurch of CyprusProfessor Dr Miltiadis KonstantinouChurch of GreeceBishop Ilia of PhilomelionChurch of AlbaniaThe Revd Dr Christos B ChristakisCo-SecretaryMembers unable to attend:Protopresbyter Giorgi ZviadadzePatriarchate of GeorgiaThe Revd Fr Andrzej MinkoChurch of PolandRepresentatives of the Anglican CommunionThe Most Revd Roger Herft of PerthThe Anglican Church of Australia, Co-ChairmanThe Revd Marc BillimoriaThe Church of CeylonThe Most Revd Dr Richard Clarke of ArmaghThe Church of IrelandThe Revd Canon Deacon Dr Christine HallThe Church of EnglandThe Revd Canon Philip Hobson OGSThe Anglican Church of CanadaMs Natasha KlukachThe Anglican Church of CanadaThe Rt Revd Michael Lewis of Cyprus & the GulfThe Episcopal Church in Jerusalem & the Middle EastThe Revd Dr Gloria MapangdolThe Episcopal Church in the PhilippinesThe Revd Dr Duncan ReidThe Anglican Church of AustraliaThe Revd Canon Professor John RichesScottish Episcopal ChurchThe Rt Revd John Stroyan of WarwickThe Church of EnglandThe Revd Canon Dr John GibautCo-SecretaryThe Revd Neil VigersAnglican Communion OfficeMembers Unable to Attend:The Revd Dr Timothy BradshawThe Church of EnglandThe Revd Dr Joseph WanderaThe Anglican Church of KenyaThe Rt Revd Dr Rowan WilliamsRepresentative of the Archbishop of Canterbury Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Posted Sep 25, 2015 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

first_img February 17, 2016 at 3:39 pm As a gay man living in the United States, I believe that this issue, like contraception in the 1920’s and divorce will eventually cease to be so controversial. If it is God’s will it we prevail over time, if it is not God’s will, it will fade away. In the mean time it is important for everybody to listen more than they talk and to continue to pray together. May God’s will be known, because it will be done. February 17, 2016 at 7:35 pm Well put Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI February 17, 2016 at 7:44 pm Considering we aren’t going backwards, what is the Communion going to try next? TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Steve Catanichq says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Frank Riggio Preston says: Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA February 20, 2016 at 6:01 pm I would like to know what Archbishop Welby actually believes about the issue of gay marriage, and whether he agrees with the Primates’ actions concerning TEC. Throughout his very lengthy address, he tells us nothing about his personal views. Does he believe that gay marriage should be prohibited by civil law; is he in favor of the sanctions (excuse me, “consequences”) imposed on TEC? Or did he agree to them only for the sake of institutional (in this case, the Communion’s) unity? Is he willing to impose “consequences” on African churches that support oppression of gays? Submit an Event Listing February 17, 2016 at 7:42 pm r Continuation Group, and in numerous other places, as a collection of autonomous and interdependent churches. The autonomy means that no meeting of the Communion has any authority to give instructions to individual provinces.We didn’t tell any other province to follow us. The Communion and the other Provincs have n authority to censure us or demand anything regardless of what verb you want to use The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Archbishop of Canterbury, Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Primates Meeting 2016 reaction Frank Riggio Preston says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC February 16, 2016 at 7:35 pm I read with sadness the Archbishop’s very lengthy attempt to defend what the Primates did to TEC. He says there’s no mention of “sanction” or “punishment” in the communique but rather “consequences”. Well, whoop-do-do! It sure makes a difference what words you use when you slap somebody down. He refers to one Province doing something that has a “profound effect” on the other Provinces. TEC didn’t ask, let alone force, any other Province to follow us. TEC has no right to do so. Instead, TEC is being required to forsake the path we we have been called by Jesus to follow and being punished for failing to do so. Finally, referring to history , he refers to the “laying down of edicts by white middle-class Christians from the Global North” as being “deeply resented.” Wow! Who is laying down edicts now? Against whom?The Jesus I know, by his words, his actions and the people he associated with, is clear: every person is to be treated equally with every other person. That is why TEC, in following our Lord, had no choice but to take the action it did.When Many and Joseph came to the inn they were told “There is no room for you.” We in TEC have met the innkeeper, but we have no doubt that Jesus and his love will prevail. But, having read this missive from Archbishop Welby, I have to wonder if the Anglican Communion has outlived its relevance and its usefulness. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Don Nicholson says: Comments (8) Posted Feb 15, 2016 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Anglican Communion News Service] The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has used his presidential address to the Church of England’s General Synod to update members on last month’s Primates Meeting and Gathering in Canterbury. He also gave his impression about the current state of the Anglican Communion. Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA February 16, 2016 at 8:48 pm Honestly, the meaning of marriage has shifted in the course of Christian history. It is a matter of discipline, not doctrine. He speaks of human freedom and flourishing and then denies it to lgbt Christians. In parts of Africa gay Christians face draconian penalties. If there are consequences for TEC, why not for the human rights abuses of global South Anglican leaders. It’s just more spin, but by the Abp. of Canterbury. He is trying to justify his actions to a synod where at least some are in deep sympathy with TEC. Video: Archbishop Justin Welby unpacks Primates’ communiqué Rector Martinsville, VA February 16, 2016 at 2:36 pm Did not the original “spin” come from the poisoned pen of George Conger at Anglican Ink, who apparently got a version of the discussion from a contact within the Primates’ meeting? This article was published, if I recall correctly, while the meeting was still going on, and it yielded George opportunities to offer “expert” commentary in the Washington Post and elsewhere. And so is a narrative formed …http://www.anglican.ink/article/primates-suspend-episcopal-church-full-participation-anglican-communion Primates Meeting, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Frank Riggio Preston says: Primates Meeting 2016, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Robin Garr says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Donald Lowery says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Justin Welby’s Presidential Address to the General SynodWestminster, London15 February 2015The Primates’ Meeting held in Canterbury between 11th and 15th January 2016 occasioned much comment and even more misrepresentation. It has been spun more than Donald Trump, and you would be well advised to set your spin meters to “detect” as I am hoping both to say something about what happened, at least from my point of view… and more importantly, why and what it says to us. I have no doubt most people will disagree with one or the other aspect, or all of them.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby delivers his presidential address to the Church of England’s General Synod to brief members Feb. 15 about last month’s Primates’ Meeting in Canterbury.Photo: Gavin Drake/Anglican Communion News ServiceThe spin included such elements as saying that the Primates had had their phones removed, and that they were being treated as children. Even some seasoned journalist believed this and printed it as fact.It became quite a joke among us, with people waving their phones at me from time to time to indicate that my powers were limited. Neither were they treated as children. Secretary General, sit up and keep your hands still. [Laughter]My original aim, after wide consultation with Primates, had been to attend a series of regional meetings of Primates over the course of 2016 and 2017, before having a full Primates’ Meeting in 2018, as a run up to the Lambeth Conference which was aimed for 2020.However, following the General Convention of The Episcopal Church (TEC) in June 2015, and the decision of the General Convention to alter their definition of marriage so as to be gender neutral, I spent last August and early September ringing all of the Primates in order to take their advice on the next steps. It became clear that a Primates’ Meeting was required sooner rather than later.It was also evident that were it to be convened in the normal way, there would be very significant absences, as was the case at Dublin in 2011. Archbishop Foley Beach of the Anglican Church of North America (ACNA), who has a close relationship with many of the Primates who form the Global Anglican Futures Conference (GAFCON) and the Global South, was therefore invited. Given the tensions that exist in North America, it speaks much of the graciousness of the Archbishop Fred Hiltz of Canada and the then presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts-Schori and her successor Michael Curry, as well as Archbishop Foley Beach, that despite being deeply unhappy, they were still willing to come to the meeting – and we should be duly grateful to all of them.As you know, it was described as a Primates’ Gathering and Meeting, as the Meeting proper could only include those provinces which are recognised as institutionally part of the Anglican Communion (as distinct from churches which have an Anglican tradition and identity). To be part of the institution of the Anglican Communion a Province must be in communion with the See of Canterbury. That was upheld as it had been understood previously at the Lambeth Conference of1930, and was often repeated, most recently in the Eames Report 3.32). And also a Province has to be on the schedule of Provinces held by the ACC and supported by two thirds of the Primates in one way or another. There is no clear process or precedent for a new Province to join, except as an agreed spin-off from a previous Province.The meeting was set for Canterbury because that would recall to people the way in which Canterbury, and especially its cathedral, represent the center of the Anglican Communion. That the Meeting achieved what it did is a great tribute to the extraordinary work done by the Dean and Chapter, and indeed all the staff at Canterbury Cathedral, whose gift of Benedictine hospitality, of calm organization, and whose ability to create a sense of security and safety in the midst of much disagreement, are absolutely unparalleled. We owe them a great deal.It may help to give you a sense of what the meeting was like by describing the final Eucharist in the Crypt of Canterbury Cathedral, the oldest part of the building.We sat in a semi-circle around the altar, laid for the Eucharist. On one side of it, and a little in front, was the Crozier of St Gregory, Pope Gregory the Great, who had sent Augustine in 597 for the re-evangelization of these Islands, at least according to the Roman tradition. The Crozier is very beautiful, with inspiration which I suspect is drawn from the apocalypse, of a carved ivory lamb rising above attack by a dragon. I was present when it arrived on the Friday before the meeting began, and watched as those unpacking it were moved to tears by its beauty and historic significance. Its loan for the week, from the Prior of San Gregorio, with the blessing and active support of the British ambassador to the Holy See, and of the Italian authorities, and much support from the Vatican itself, was a symbol of ecumenical unity that was most remarkable.On the other side of the altar, and just in front of it, were the Augustine Gospels, loaned for the day by Corpus Christi College Cambridge, and brought down, setting off at 3am, simply for the service. That again was a gift that we gratefully received. They are authenticated as dating from the 6th Century and are beautifully illuminated. Again, they provided forceful symbolism of our call to continue in the tradition started so long ago.Before the altar, during the Ministry of the Word, sat Jean Vanier, who had spoken to us on the Thursday evening after Evensong, and addressed us during the Eucharist, on John Chapter 13, the washing of the feet. He led us both in meditating on that passage, and then in washing each other’s feet, so that all Primates washed each other’s feet.It seemed to me as I sat there that much of what we are about, as the Anglican Communion, as God’s people, was symbolised in the way everything was laid out:The Ministry of the Sacrament recalled to us that through the sacrament we reaffirm our catholicity – our essential unity with all Christians everywhere and in every time.The pastoral staff spoke to us of the conquest of Evil, of the call for unity, of the shepherding of the people of God, in simplicity and in holiness.The Gospels, the Word of the Scriptures, unfold to us the life of Jesus our Saviour, Word and Sacrament held together.And Jean Vanier himself, a living symbol of what true simplicity and discipleship means for the life of the Church today.We washed each other’s feet and each prayed a blessing on the one who had washed our feet, before washing the feet of other Primates; a great contrast to what is often portrayed as the conflicts within the Communion. Many of us were moved to tears.I start there, because it sets before us the reality of the Anglican Communion. It is the very work of God inspired by the Spirit, full of fallible human beings who must confess their sins and who require the comforts of the Word and the hope of the Sacraments and the example of the Saints and the shepherding of those called by God, however weak they may be, into leadership, if we are to be to the world the symbols of unity, which are our calling and purpose, and which will enable us to proclaim more confidently the Good News of Jesus Christ. We here in this Synod are but one very small part of it, both in time and space, and we are called to the covenant of unity, of catholicity, with past present and future. As one part, albeit a small one, we are of infinite value, and are held by the grace of God for infinite good.We were conscious as we met in that week that literally millions, possibly tens of millions, of people were praying for us, and I have never known a week in which I have been so aware of prayer, or of pressure.One of the moments in which we voted – and you don’t vote often at these meetings, according to those who’ve been to several of them – was on the question, when all seemed lost, as to whether we would walk together or separately. And it did seem lost. The vote to walk together, after a warning – repeated twice – that to undertake to do so meant to take a personal responsibility for it happening properly, was unanimous. It was done by open voting of raised hands, and was total. However, the divisions were profound, and remain so. We should not have any illusions of the fragility of the process, or of the outcome.A working group then sought a way of turning that vote to walk together into action and decision. I did not expect them to reach an agreement, certainly until shortly before the ACC meeting in Lusaka in April. But thanks to their own dedication and commitment, and to the support of facilitators and mediators, they managed to reach an agreement which was put to the Meeting the next day and adopted by an overwhelming majority.The vote was immediately spun outside the Meeting, having been leaked on the Thursday (the day before it ended) as a severe sanction on TEC. You will not find the word ‘sanction’ or ‘punishment’ or anything like it at any point in the Communique, or the Addendum which refers to the decision taken. The word used is ‘consequence’.Provinces of the Anglican Communion have been recognized since its beginning at the first Lambeth Conference of 1857, and as emphasized in 1920 and 1930, in 1978, 1988 and 1998, in the Virginia Report, the Eames Report and the Windsor Continuation Group, and in numerous other places, as a collection of autonomous and interdependent churches. The autonomy means that no meeting of the Communion has any authority to give instructions to individual provinces.No province is legally bound by the Communion; there is no synodical group within the Communion. The interdependence recognizes what I spoke of when describing the final Eucharist: that we belong to one another through the action of God, as called to be one in Scripture, as having lived as one traditionally, and as reflecting reasonably the life of the Trinity by our unity in diversity.Where a Province decides to take action that has a profound effect on other Provinces, either because it is outside of the received doctrine of the Communion or through its day-to-day impact (in this case both) then there will be consequences.That seems obvious. Actions have results.The decision by the Primates, for TEC in this case (it could be for other Provinces on other matters in the future) would be that since they were in disagreement with the Communion on a significant issue, they should not represent the Communion ecumenically, or in its principle elected standing committees. Nor should they vote on matters of doctrine or polity. This decision binds the Primates as a group, but not any Province or other Instrument of Communion. It is a powerful and morally forceful guideline, to use language from the Windsor Continuation Group in 2008. The Presiding Bishop [of The Episcopal Church, Michael Curry] described the Primates’ decision as a fair outcome.The underlying issue is about reception. Both before, but especially since, Lambeth 1920, reception has meant the informal process by which, over time, developments are accepted or rejected in a way that leads to consensus. Thus, issues in 1920 around contraception, in Lambeth 1930 and 1948 around divorce, were at the time seen as threatening the unity of the Communion as seriously as issues of human sexuality now. Reception goes both ways. There has been a consensus against lay presidency, despite significant pressure in the past, but the reception process rejected it. It is not a legal process, but a discernment of the Spirit based in relationship.The importance of this is very great indeed. The Anglican Communion finds its decisions through spiritual discernment in relationship, not through canons and procedures. Those operate at Provincial level. All developments must show signs of the presence of the Spirit, not only locally but across the Communion. Primates’ Meetings, Lambeth Conferences and ACCs are not a question of winning and losing, but of discerning.For me, apart from the final Eucharist, the most remarkable aspect of the Primates’ Meeting was the energy that was released when we acted together. For the first time, I experienced the beauty of the Communion when, on issues affecting us very widely – often issues of life and death – there was a sharing and an outpouring of mutual support.For example, we shared together around issues of the environment, something we discussed here last July in terms of its future impact. If you are in Polynesia, as the Archbishop of York so vividly demonstrated to us, it is a matter of life and death. To quote the Archbishop of Polynesia at the meeting, “We are drowning!”We discussed the interaction with Islam in various places around the world, and shared how we could support each other, and what are the essentials of dialogue – both for those countries which are in a non-Islamic majority and for those who are in a minority.We spoke of evangelism, and I hope that this Synod will take due note both now and in the discussion we will have tomorrow, of the extraordinarily powerful declaration made unanimously by the Primates in the Communique. I might add that the Christocentric and passionately evangelistic approach of the new Presiding Bishop of TEC had a great impact on many.We agreed a Lambeth Conference for 2020. We must pray that the conference of 2020 itself recovers some of the radicality, even revolutionary spirit that was shown in 1920, in its call to all Christian people to repent of their divisions – a call that was at the beginning of the modern ecumenical movement. 2020 must enables not just Anglicanism but the whole Church to find fresh ways forward that represent more clearly to the world the hope that is in Jesus Christ.During all these discussions, those who are theologically in very different places in the Communion demonstrated their profound support for one another, and there was a great sense of collective effort, of common vision, of love for one another and for the service of the world. It is a vision which encompasses rich and poor, north and south, breaking down barriers in the cause of Christ and the kingdom of God. It is lived out not mainly in the great meetings but in Diocesan links and partnerships, in prayer, in celebration, in grieving.We rightly talk of scripture, of tradition and reason, but in the tension in which we live in a Global Church, there is another trio, of freedom, order and human flourishing, set out by Tim Jenkins in an article in 2002. As a Communion (and as churches) where authority is found in discernment, and expressed in relationship, this trio is of huge importance. It anchors us in the breaking down of barriers, in facing each other, in the beauty of human interaction in love.Disaster has come whenever one element has overcome the others to an excessive degree. A hunger for power, masquerading as order, has very often overcome freedom, and neglected human flourishing. Order is essential, but it exists to assure foot washing and love, not domination. Certainly after the Reformation, and the religious wars that dominated Europe for the following 100 years or more, it was a sense of perverted order that led to the appalling cruelty which is almost without parallel in Europe until the 20th Century. The Church, confronted by modernity, sought power through order rather than human flourishing or freedom: it was out of these tensions that Anglicanism emerged, and from 1857 and the first Lambeth Conference, developed a relational model of authority.The Church in its order is meant to encourage the freedom in Christ that is promised, and human flourishing that is the vision of the kingdom of God. When the balance is wrong, and even more so when we feel threatened, like a ship with a dysfunctional crew heading for the rocks, different groups all strive to grab the wheel so that, as they see it, they may demonstrate that they and only they know the way to avoid disaster.The reality is that none of them do know fully, and disaster is only avoided by unity which relishes and celebrates the diversity of freedom and flourishing within broad limits of order.That is what many of the discussions in the Communion are about. What are the limits of diversity? Who is in control? British colonial history makes the laying down of edicts by white, middle-class Christians from the Global North, citizens of the former colonial power in many places, a process that is rightly deeply resented.Yet freedom cannot be found without order, and order and freedom are necessary for human flourishing.If we bring to our Church, and to the world around, the certainty that Jesus came to set us free, and to open the way for true human flourishing in service to each other and to Him; if our expectation in that only in foot washing, even of our enemies, is the Truth demonstrated adequately, then in beauty of relationship the grace of God will prevail, as that grace did during the Primates’ MeetingLife will not be perfect, or even anything remotely approaching it. That kind of over-realized eschatology is a nonsense. There are no quick fixes, magic wands or perfect spells. There is no church order that ensures perfection, nor one in which human sin does not add to the problems of the whole.Yet there is a way forward that reveals the unity that we are given, and that celebrates the strength that we can bring each other. That enables us to love those who oppose us, and that focuses on human flourishing and on the setting free those who are bound by rules which Jesus could never have imagined, nor Paul (let’s put that old idiocy to rest), and which have emerged out of a desire for power rather than the expectation of the kingdom of God. There is, in short, a way forward in which we look like the people of Christ. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL William Russiello says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

first_imgThe great Black leader, Malcolm X —also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz — was born on May 19, 1925. His birth name was Malcolm Little.As a child, he experienced the horrors of racism growing up in Lansing, Mich., where his father, Earl Little, was lynched when Malcolm was six years old. When Malcolm told one of his teachers that he wanted to be a lawyer, she discouraged him from pursuing this career because he was Black.When he went to prison in the early 1950s for petty crimes, Malcolm’s political outlook blossomed as he met and joined the Nation of Islam, the largest mass Black organization in the U.S.As his political reputation as a nationalist leader grew while imprisoned, Malcolm drew the attention and ire of the FBI’s counterintelligence program, known as Cointelpro. This repressive program — created by then FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and sanctioned by every branch of the U.S. government — targeted any mass movements inside the U.S. that sought self-determination and national liberation from racist repression. The FBI’s tactics included demonizing through disinformation, frame-ups leading to incarceration and killings of political leaders of movements led by the oppressed.Malcolm X’s advocacy for the right to armed self-defense against state repression influenced mass organizations such as the Black Panther Party, the Deacons for Self-Defense, the Young Lords, the American Indian Movement and many others. These groups eventually were targeted by Cointelpro, along with countless heroic leaders like Malcolm X, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Assata Shakur, Fred Hampton, Safiya Bukhari, Mumia Abu-Jamal and Leonard Peltier.Malcolm X’s political consciousness broadened from revolutionary Black Nationalism at home to anti-capitalist internationalism based on his travels abroad, especially to Africa, Asia and the Middle East. He once stated, “The same man that was colonizing our people in Kenya was colonizing our people in Congo. The same one in the Congo was colonizing our people in South Africa, and in Southern Rhodesia, and in Burma and in India, and in Afghanistan, and in Pakistan. They realized all over the world where the dark man was being oppressed, he was being oppressed by the white man; where the dark man was being exploited, he was being exploited by the white man.” (Malcolm X Speaks, 1965)A week before his assassination, he stated, “It is incorrect to classify the revolt of the Negro as simply a racial conflict of Black against White, or as a purely American problem. Rather, we are today seeing a global rebellion of the oppressed against the oppressor, the exploited against the exploiter.”After leaving the NOI, Malcolm X initiated the short-lived Organization of Afro-American Unity in 1964 to help promote Pan-Africanism and broaden solidarity between Black people at home and globally. He was assassinated while giving a speech at the Audubon Ballroom auditorium on Feb. 21, 1965. It is widely known that the U.S. government was behind the assassination.As the late Panther leader Fred Hampton — who was assassinated by Chicago police on Dec. 4, 1969 — once stated, “You can kill a revolutionary but you can’t kill the revolution.” These prophetic words certainly apply to Malcolm X, whose inspiring words and legacy will live on.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

first_imgVenezuelan Consul General Jesus Rodriguez Espinoza was a special guest speaker from Chicago at the April 27 weekly meeting of the Moratorium NOW! Coalition to Stop Foreclosures, Evictions, and Utility Shutoffs and the Michigan Emergency Committee Against War & Injustice in Detroit. Rodriguez discussed the U.S. destabilization campaign against the Bolivarian Revolution aimed at reversing the gains of the revolution since 1998. Rodriguez was given a T-shirt in support of the freedom of Rev. Pinkney by Yvonne Jones, retired city of Detroit employee. This photo shows Rodriguez, left, talking with Fight Imperialism, Stand Together (FIST) activist Joe Mchahwar of Detroit.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

first_img RSF_en Nay Phone Latte, a young blogger who has been held since 29 January in Insein prison, is facing a possibly seven-year sentence after new charges were brought against him on 7 July under the article 5 (j) of the 1950 Emergency Provision Act, article 505 (b) of the criminal code (which punishes defaming the state) and article 33 (a) of the Electronic Act. He was originally charged under article 32 (b) of the Video Act, which would have limited his maximum detention to six months. The new charges were approved by a special court in Insein prison, where his lawyer has never been allowed to see him since his arrest. Another court appearance was scheduled for 16 July, but Nay Phone Latte told his mother it has been postponed. Meanwhile, he has contracted an eye problem but the prison authorities are not letting him see a doctor.————–21.04.2008 Imprisoned blogger visited by mother, still does not know reason for arrest Blogger Nay Phone Latt, who has been held in Insein prison since February, was allowed a visit by his mother today. “He is all right,” she said. “He told me he did not yet know why he was arrested and that his release did not seem to be imminent.” She added that he is due to be tried at the end of the month. “Nay Phone Latt has been held for nearly three months,” Reporters Without Borders said. “He has not been tried and no clear charges have been brought against him. His detention is therefore clearly a human rights violation and we reiterate our call for his release.” He was arrested on 29 January under section 5 (J) of the 1950 Emergency Provision Act – which sanctions any attempt to “disrupt morality” or to “disrupt security, stability or the restoration of order” – simply for having a video that has been banned by the military government. Initially held at the interior ministry, he was transferred to Insein prison after one week. He faces a possible seven-year jail sentence. The owner of two Rangoon Internet cafés, Nay Phone Latt keeps a blog (http://www.nayphonelatt.net/) in which he has written about the difficulties that young people have in expressing themselves, especially since last autumn’s protests. He was arrested with several members of the opposition National League for Democracy, who were released a few hours later.To know more about- The Internet in Burma- Last Automn’s protests- Press freedom in Burma News May 12, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts US journalist held in Yangon prison notorious for torture MyanmarAsia – Pacific MyanmarAsia – Pacific Follow the news on Myanmar Thai premier, UN rapporteurs asked to prevent journalists being returned to Myanmar to go furthercenter_img Organisation July 11, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Nay Phone Latte faces up to seven years in prison News News RSF asks Germany to let Myanmar journalist Mratt Kyaw Thu apply for asylum May 26, 2021 Find out more May 31, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Newslast_img read more

first_img Pinterest Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp WhatsApp Previous articleGardai warn businesses of rise in change scams in DonegalNext articleEntries open for 2020 Donegal Half Marathon News Highland Google+ Facebook 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today Twittercenter_img 1,504 people were awaiting beds at LUH in 2020 Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny By News Highland – January 1, 2020 Facebook Figures published by the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation figures show over 53 thousand people were awaiting hospital beds over the course of 2020, 1,504 of them at Letterkenny University Hospital.That’s a 280% fall on the hospital’s 2019 figure.2020 saw 1,504 people awaiting in-patient beds at Letterkenny University Hospital over the course of the year. That compares to 5,727 in 2019.The Covid 19 pandemic saw the figures drop substantially after March.January and February saw 392 and 352 respectively, while April’s figure was zero.Figures were in the low double digits over the early summer, but started rising again, with 188 in October, 99 in November and 128 in December.This year’s total was the lowest since 2013’s total of 1,277.Sligo University Hosptial was one of the six highest in the country, with 2,530 waiting this year compared to 4,967 in 2019.The INMO says such overcrowding poses an infection control risk which the union is describing as “unacceptable”. Google+ Homepage BannerNews NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly News, Sport and Obituaries on Wednesday May 26th Nine Til Noon Show – Listen back to Wednesday’s Programmelast_img read more

first_imgNews UpdatesJ&K HC Using SMS Service To Disseminate Relevant Information On COVID-19 Among Lawyers/ Litigants LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK19 April 2020 10:36 PMShare This – xThe Jammu and Kashmir High Court in coordination with J&K Legal Services Authority has devised a “robust mechanism” for disseminating information and spreading awareness about the COVID-19, through text messaging. Using the database of lawyers and litigants maintained by the High Court as well as District Courts of UTs of J&K and Ladakh, the High Court of Jammu and Kashmir is…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Jammu and Kashmir High Court in coordination with J&K Legal Services Authority has devised a “robust mechanism” for disseminating information and spreading awareness about the COVID-19, through text messaging. Using the database of lawyers and litigants maintained by the High Court as well as District Courts of UTs of J&K and Ladakh, the High Court of Jammu and Kashmir is using SMS services for sharing relevant information about the pandemic. As per a press release issued on this behalf, the High Court has till date flashed around 10 lakh SMS to the lawyers and litigants, informing them about various advisories/ guidelines/ helplines issued by the WHO, the Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and the Medical Education Department of J&K, for preventing the spread of corona virus. “Various Dos and Don’ts, precautionary measures as well as myth busters regarding Novel Corona Virus (COVID-19) are being flashed through SMS sent on regular intervals,” the press note states. Additionally, general public is being informed through SMS about the names and contact numbers of Secretaries of the District Legal Services Authority and of Para Legal Volunteers of J&K Legal Service Authorities so that they can be contacted in case of any emergency related to COVID-19. Earlier, the J&K High Court had issued a series of orders to ensure social distancing, so as to break the transmission cycle of the deadly virus. All the Judges of the High Court had also contributed Rs. 25,000/- each for the welfare of persons affected by the pandemic. Next Storylast_img read more

first_imgPersonal profileOn 11 Jul 2000 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. What is the most important lesson you have learnt in your career? To achieve a healthy balance between work and play.What is the strangest situation you have had to deal with at work?Many years ago in my first HR role, an employee was late for a disciplinary meeting to discuss his persistent lateness, and gave for his excuse that his digital watch had been struck by lightning.Imagine being stranded on a desert island with enough food for only two people. Who would you choose as your companion and why?My partner, Julie, or someone famous so that we were rescued quickly!If you had three wishes to change your company, what would they be?That’s difficult because I’d like to think that if there were three wishes we’d already have started making the changes.What is the best thing about working in HR?The opportunity to make a substantial impact on the success of customers and partners, the people working within the business, and the business itself.What is the worst?Dealing with people who stubbornly refuse to see the value that HR can add.You have stumbled upon a time machine hidden in the vaults of your company building. What time period would you visit and why?Fifty years into the future so that I could come back and play my part in re-shaping it to be a better place.If you could adopt the management style of an historical character, whose would you adopt and why?Winston Churchill for his charismatic leadership, quick wit, and total determination.How do you get to work?Either by walking into my study at home or by car into my work office.What would you do if you had more spare time?More exercise, and some time doing absolutely nothing.If you were to write a book, which subject would you choose to write about?Time travel.What is your greatest strength?Being me and not trying to be someone I’m not.What is your least appealing characteristic? A very short attention span.What is the greatest risk you ever took?Taking Coram Curve at Snetterton Race Track flat out in my race car – and crashing at 120mph (my hobby is motor racing. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more