first_imgShop for groceries lastIf you’re running several errands, make the grocery store yourlast stop, she said, since cold foods must stay cold. When youget home, quickly put away the foods that need to be refrigeratedor frozen.To encourage little eaters to reach for fresh fruits and veggies,put them at kid’s-eye-level in your refrigerator.”This will encourage them to eat them,” Hanula said. “The samegoes for raw vegetables. Have them ready-to-eat and clearlyvisible in the refrigerator. Making nutritional food choicesaccessible for children is really a good idea at snack time.” Buy quick fixes, tooDon’t forget convenience foods for quick family meals. “Choosefoods you can prepare quickly for days when you’re on the run,”she said. “A dozen eggs, canned soup, frozen pizza, a jar ofspaghetti sauce and pasta are just a few items that can betransformed into quick meals for your family.” When you have your list in hand and you’re ready to head to thesupermarket, Hanula said, leave your kids with a sitter. Anddon’t headout hungry.”Shopping on an empty stomach can ruin your budget plan,” shesaid. “And little helpers tossing in items they’d like cansabotage your plan, too.”Reducing the number of times you shop will keep your food billdown, too. “If you try to make just one trip to the grocery storeeach week, you’ll also save on fuel costs,” Hanula said. “Nowthat gasoline prices are so high, it can make a real differencein your budget.” Don’t waste food”Up to 25 percent of all edible food goes to waste,” Hanula said.”That’s just like throwing money away, so you should definitelyplan how you’ll use those leftovers.”Hanula says planning your household menus ahead of time is a goodidea nutritionally. She recommends setting aside 30 minutes toplan your family’s weekly meals. Once you’ve completed one week’smenu list, she said, save it and use it again in three or fourweeks.”Most of us don’t vary the foods we eat from month to month,” shesaid. “Of course, there are some seasonal differences to accountfor.”When planning menus, she said, remember fruits and vegetables.Buy them fresh to eat first, and stock up on canned and frozenones to eat later in the week.center_img By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaA grocery list and a little preplanning can lead to a lower foodbill and a healthier diet, a University of Georgia expert says.”You’re more likely to include a variety of foods and to includefruits and vegetables if you shop from a list,” said Gail Hanula,a nutrition specialist with the UGA Extension Service. “This canlead to your family eating a healthier diet while you savemoney.”Save money? Shopping lists help food shoppers take advantage ofweekly store specials, she said. They also help you make wise useof leftovers.last_img read more

first_imgGet the cheese sauce ready. Broccoli and cauliflower could be coming out of the garden really soon if you get busy.Although these aren’t what you’d call traditional Southern vegetables, growing great broccoli and cauliflower in your garden is a definite possibility in Georgia. Throughout the Southeast, both crops can be grown during certain times of the season.In much of the Southeast, temperatures are too cold in midwinter to grow them well, since both crops can suffer freeze damage. And it’s too hot in midsummer, as the heat reduces quality. In the higher elevations, however, midsummer is peak production time.In the Georgia coastal plain and piedmont, plant broccoli and cauliflower from early February through early April, depending on where you live. This would bring in harvests during mid-April through June.For fall crops, plant them from August through mid-September for harvest in October through early December. In the higher elevations, plant the crops in April to July for harvest in June through September.Many varieties of both broccoli and cauliflower have been shown to perform well in Georgia. “Packman” and “Premium Crop” are two tried-and-true broccoli varieties for home garden use.Many cauliflower varieties are self-blanching and don’t have to be banded to produce a white-curded head. “Candid Charm” and “Snowball Y” are widely adapted cauliflowers.There are varieties, however, that tolerate temperature extremes better than these.Both crops can be direct-seeded or transplanted, but transplanting is best in the Southeast to gain time in the growing window and produce more uniform stands.Broccoli and cauliflower can be grown on a wide array of soil types. Both crops require irrigation for peak production.Planting densities vary between the crops. Broccoli can be planted in double rows on 38- to 42-inch centers, with plants spaced 6 inches apart. Cauliflower, though, is usually planted in single rows with an in-row spacing of about 12 inches.Fertilize broccoli and cauliflower much as you would cabbage, as both require a fairly heavy rate of nitrogen. Use rates of 6.5 to 7.5 ounces per 100 square feet with both crops. For soils testing medium for phosphorus and potassium, 4 ounces of each per 100 square feet should suffice.Split the totals into thirds and apply the first at planting and the second and third about three weeks apart.The most rewarding part of any garden crop is the harvest. Handle these crops with care, though. They’re quite perishable and must be cooled fairly quickly after harvest. If you don’t cool them quickly to 32 degrees Fahrenheit, the quality will begin to break down. Cauliflower is even more tedious — handle it cautiously to keep from bruising the curds.Grow broccoli to a central main head 3 to 4 inches across before cutting it. The plant will regrow many smaller heads if you keep caring for it. You can cut these smaller heads as they mature. They won’t reach the size of the central head, but still make for a good second crop. Cut broccoli with about 5 inches of stem on it.Cut cauliflower when the curd is 4 to 6 inches across, and trim the leaves.(Terry Kelley is a former University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulturist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) William Terry KelleyUniversity of Georgialast_img read more

first_imgEngaged couples in Forsyth County are being sought for the pre-marital preparation and relationship enhancement program provided by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and College of Family and Consumer Sciences. Couples can enroll for a series of six one-on-one sessions with a trained counselor or attend an all-day workshop. One-on-one sessions will be determined by the schedules of the participants and counselors. A day-long program, limited to 12 couples, is scheduled for March 20 at the Sharon Springs Community Building located at Sharon Springs Park. Registration for either option is $60, but couples who complete the program will qualify for a $35 discount on their marriage license. For more information, visit www.gamarriages.com or contact Michele Melton, Forsyth County FACS extension agent, at 770-887-2418 or msmelton@uga.edu.last_img read more

first_imgIf a child has access to the Internet, text messaging or email, they could become a victim of cyberbullying. According to recent surveys, more than 40 percent of students in fourth through eighth grades have been the victim of some form of online bullying. Cyberbullying is bullying through email, instant messaging, in chat rooms, on a website, through digital messages, or images sent to a cellular phone. “Cyberbullying is unique,” said Cheryl Varnadoe, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension 4-H specialist and cyberbullying expert. “It not only looks and feels different than traditional bullying, but presents some unusual challenges in dealing with it. Damage done by cyberbullies is real. And in some cases, can be more painful than traditional bullying.” Research conducted by Georgia 4-H’s Youth Technology Leadership Team shows that children may not tell parents they have been harassed online. “As children get older, the likeliness of them reporting the abuse is less likely,” she said. “One reason they are less prone to tell is they say we didn’t listen or believe them when they did come and tell us.” Parents should pay attention, she said, and take action if their children are: Hesitant to be online. Nervous when receiving an instant message, email or text. Upset after using the computer or cell phone. Hiding or clearing the computer screen or closing the phone when parents enter the room.Withdrawing from friends.Falling behind in schoolwork or avoiding school.Very moody or crying. Almost all American teens use the Internet on a daily basis, according to a recent study by Pew Internet. Approximately 23 million youth log on every day. Most parents, 81 percent, don’t think teens are careful when sharing information online or on their cell phones. More than half of parents and teens agree teenagers do things online they wouldn’t want their parents to know about. Roughly 60 percent of teens own a cell phone and spend on average an hour a day talking and texting, according to U.S. Cellular Statistics. Teach kids to be safe online“As youth go online in increasing numbers, cyber ethics is a critical lesson,” Varnadoe said. “Online, people can feel invisible and capable of doing things they normally wouldn’t do in person or in public.”Tell children not to hurt others online, respect privacy, be responsible, ignore insults from others and be themselves. Appropriate online communication is a proactive way to discourage cyberbullying and make children aware of what is not allowed, she said. “As a parent or caretaker, your goal is to keep a good ongoing dialogue with your child so they will feel comfortable telling you if something bad happens online or somewhere else,” she said. “Build a relationship of trust and then listen carefully to what your child says about their online experiences. Let your child know you believe them and will help them feel safe. Be clear that you need to know if your child receives an inappropriate message, both on and offline.”Spreading the word“I saw my tech team (Georgia 4-H Youth Technology Leadership Team) in a room with a group of kids, and they would rather text and email than talk to each other,” she said. “I also saw them going to a website that allows anonymous postings and being mean. These kids were supposed to be the leaders and teaching others about responsible behavior. I decided then I needed to learn what to do and how to work with others and teach others how to do the same.” Varnadoe created the Cyber Security Initiative to educate youth across the state on cyberbullying and Internet safety. The program introduces youth and adults to the rules of cybercitizenship. Partnering with local UGA Extension offices, the Georgia 4-H Youth Technology Leadership Team travels around the state to lead free classes on cyberbullying, Internet safety and social networking. The program is funded by the State Farm Youth Advisory Board.For more information and to schedule programs, contact Varnadoe at cv4h@uga.edu.last_img read more

first_imgRecently, University of Georgia researchers worked with a team of scientists to help sequence and analyze the genome of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. Black beans, pinto beans, kidney beans, green beans, pole beans and others are varieties of the common bean. Beans are a staple crop and primary protein source for millions of people around the world, but very little has been known about their domestication or nitrogen-fixing properties until now. For the study, the team sequenced and assembled a 473-million basepair genome of the common bean. Thought to have originated in Mexico more than 100,000 years ago, the common bean was domesticated separately at two different geographic locations in Mesoamerica and the Andes. The team compared sequences from pooled populations representing these regions, finding only a small fraction of shared genes. This indicated that different events had been involved in the domestication process at each location. The project was supported by the DOE Office of Science, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture and the National Science Foundation. “Unlocking the genetic makeup of the common bean is a tremendous achievement that will lead to future advances in feeding the world’s growing population through improved crop production,” said Sonny Ramaswamy, director of the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. “While we have much to learn about the application of genomics in agriculture, this study is groundbreaking. I applaud the work of this team of scientists and look forward to their continued work in this important area.” The common bean ranks as the 10th most grown food crop worldwide. In addition to being an important source of protein and calories for millions of people, common bean is also important as an agricultural tool for its ability to fix nitrogen-poor soils. McClean presented on the common bean genome project at the recent Ninth Annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment Meeting. Watch the video at http://bit.ly/JGIUM9McClean. All plants require nitrogen to thrive. However, many agricultural lands are deficient in nitrogen, leading farmers to rely on chemical fertilizers to supply the needed nutrient for their crops. Scott Jackson, director of the UGA Center for Applied Genetic Technologies in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Dan Rokhsar of the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Jeremy Schmutz of the DOE JGI and the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology and Phil McClean of North Dakota State University led the team. Their work appeared in the June 8 issue of Nature Genetics. ### The team then compared the high-quality common bean genome against the sequence of its most economically important relative, the soybean. They found evidence of synteny, in which a gene in one species is present in another. They also noted that the common bean’s genome had evolved more rapidly than the soybean’s once they diverged from the last common ancestor nearly 20 million years ago. Note to editors: The work conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. This research was funded by USDA-NIFA 2006-35300-17266 and the National Science Foundation (DBI 0822258) to SAJ, and USDA-CSREES (2009-01860) and (2009-01929) to SAJ and PM, respectively. The team looked for regions associated with traits such as low diversity, flowering time and nitrogen metabolism. They found dense clusters of genes related to disease resistance within the chromosomes. They also identified a handful of genes involved in nitrogen fixing. “Common bean is an integral part of a sustainable agricultural system due to its ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen to enrich the soil,” Jackson said. “It is also an important protein source in many developing countries.” Legumes—such as the common bean and soybean—form symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, which maximize the amount of useable nitrogen plants can extract from the soil. Understanding how such symbiotic relationships are formed and sustained is crucial to improving agricultural practices, as increasing crop yields are desired both for fuel and food production. “Improvement of common bean will require a more fundamental understanding of the genetic basis of how it responds to biotic and abiotic stresses,” the team concluded. “These findings provide information on regions of the genome that have been intensely selected either during domestication or early improvement and thus provide targets for future crop improvement efforts.” This information could be beneficial for farmers practicing the intercropping system known as milpa, in which beans and maize or, occasionally, squash are planted either simultaneously or in a relay system where the beans follow maize. The practice ensures the land can continue to produce high-yield crops without resorting to fertilizer inputs or other artificial methods of providing nutrients to the soil.last_img read more

first_imgVermont Receives $9 Million Grant to Support State’s Youth in Transition EffortsWaterbury, Vt.- Governor Jim Douglas today announced that Vermont will receive over $9 million to support youth in transition through a Children’s Mental Health Initiative (CMHI) grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA).Governor Douglas said the six-year grant is meant to promote the development of integrated home and community-based services and supports for transition age youth (aged 16-22) with serious emotional disturbances, and their families.”Ensuring that young Vermonters have access to services that enable them to become self-sufficient, contributing members of society is of critical importance to my administration. I was very pleased to sign the Youth in Transition Act into law over a year ago, which provides key supports to at-risk transition-age youth until their 22nd birthday,” said Governor Jim Douglas. “This federal funding will be invaluable in our efforts as we continue to strengthen our support network for all transition age youth, particularly those with severe emotional disturbances currently served by the Agency of Human Services.”This CMHI grant will enable Vermont’s Act 264 State and Local Interagency Teams to build upon the successful Jump on Board for Success (JOBS) supported employment program, using it as a foundation for engaging transition-aged youth through teen centers, recovery centers, homeless youth programs, and at critical intervention points within the juvenile and criminal justice systems.”Our Agency is aggressively enhancing our efforts to best serve transition-age youth, including expanding Vermont youth capacity at Northlands Job Corps and coordinating the efforts of our Department for Children and Families’ Family Services Division and community partners to expand appropriate services,” said Cynthia D. LaWare, Secretary of AHS. “Through this grant, we will significantly increase community-based supports to ensure more transition age youth are actively and productively engaged in their communities and free from incarceration.”Vermont data indicates clear correlations between youth with disabilities (such as those with severe emotional disturbance) and lower rates of high school graduation, higher rates of incarceration and less access to higher education opportunities. To better serve these youth, the Agency of Human Services created a Youth in Transition Leadership Team in 2007 to design a comprehensive, one agency approach to integrate all AHS efforts to meet the needs of this population.###last_img read more

first_imgCasella Waste Systems, Inc. Announces Second Quarter Fiscal Year 2009 ResultsRUTLAND, VT, Dec 03, 2008 (MARKET WIRE via COMTEX News Network) — Casella Waste Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: CWST), a regional solid waste, recycling and resource management services company, today reported financial results for the second quarter of its 2009 fiscal year.Highlights of the quarter include:– Free cash flow* for the quarter was up $8.2 million over the sameperiod last year;– Operating income for the quarter was up 1.3 percent over same periodlast year; and– Solid waste operations continue to perform well through the economicslowdown, while the recycling group faces pressures from volatile commoditypricing.”Since the northeastern U.S. economy first began to slow in July 2006, we have taken steps to better position our business to perform well in this uncertain economic environment,” John W. Casella, chairman and CEO of Casella Waste Systems, said. “We continue to execute well against factors that we can control by combining our successful cost reduction initiatives from the past 18 months with operating programs that enhance productivity and asset utilization.””These efforts are currently offsetting economic pressures in our solid waste group, with performance in the quarter driven by increases in landfill volumes, improved operating performance of the hauling operations, and roll over impacts from the successful divestiture program of under-performing assets,” Casella said.”While it is difficult to fully assess the potential economic impacts from the financial market turmoil, the recession-resistant qualities of our integrated solid waste group will help our business maintain stability,” Casella said.”The global slowdown is negatively impacting recycling commodity pricing,” Casella said. “However, our commodity risk mitigation programs are dampening pricing exposure through the use of hedging agreements, floor price contracts, and long-term supply contracts with customers.”Second Quarter Financial ResultsFor the quarter ended October 31, 2008, the company reported revenues of $157.5 million, up $7.0 million, or 4.7 percent over the same quarter last year. The company’s net income available to common shareholders was $2.1 million or $0.08 per common share compared with net income of $2.8 million or $0.11 per common share in the same quarter last year.Operating income for the quarter was $16.0 million, up $0.2 million or 1.3 percent over the same quarter last year. Net cash provided by operating activities in the quarter was $19.4 million, compared to $15.1 million in the same quarter last year. The company’s earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA*) were $35.5 million, down $0.5 million or 1.4 percent over the same quarter last year. The company’s free cash flow for the quarter was $6.2 million, up $8.2 million over the same period last year.In early August 2008, the company ceased accepting waste at the Colebrook, NH landfill closure project, creating a negative $1.1 million EBITDA variance for the second quarter of fiscal year 2009 over the same period last year. Excluding the negative year-over-year impact of closing Colebrook, EBITDA for the quarter was up $0.6 million or 1.7 percent over the same quarter last year.Six Months Financial ResultsFor the six months ended October 31, 2008, the company reported revenues of $315.4 million, up 5.5 percent over the same period last year. The company’s net income per common share for the six month period was $0.17, compared to a net income per common share of $0.18 in the same period last year.Operating income for the six month period was $31.6 million, up $1.9 million or 6.4 percent over the same period last year. Net cash provided by operating activities for the six month period was $39.2 million, up $3.9 million compared to the same period last year. EBITDA was $70.5 million for the six month period, up $0.8 million or 1.1% from the same period last year. The company’s free cash flow for six months period was $4.4 million, up $5.5 million over the same period last year.Fiscal 2009 OutlookThe company said that its solid waste group continues to maintain a stable level of performance, while the recycling group faces pressures from softer commodity pricing. As expected in late October, commodity pricing continued to weaken during November and the company forecasts average commodity pricing to be down approximately 55 percent from our first quarter of fiscal year 2009 through the remainder of our fiscal year. The updated fiscal year 2009 guidance reflects continued weakness in commodity pricing and softening of economic conditions through the remainder of the fiscal year.The company has updated its guidance for fiscal year 2009 to the following ranges:– Revenues between $580.0 million and $600.0 million;– Free cash flow remaining constant at the original range of $8.0 millionto $14.0 million;– EBITDA between $120.0 million and $124.0 million; and– Capital expenditures between $65.0 million and $69.0 million.*Non-GAAP Financial MeasuresIn addition to disclosing financial results prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), we also disclose free cash flow and earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA), which are non-GAAP measures.These measures are provided because we understand that certain investors use this information when analyzing the financial position of companies in the solid waste industry, including us. Historically, these measures have been key in comparing operating efficiency of publicly traded companies in the solid waste industry, and assist investors in measuring our ability to meet capital expenditures, payments on landfill operating lease contracts, and working capital requirements. For these reasons we utilize these non-GAAP metrics to measure our performance at all levels. Free cash flow and EBITDA are not intended to replace “Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities,” which is the most comparable GAAP financial measure. Moreover, these measures do not necessarily indicate whether cash flow will be sufficient for such items as capital expenditures, payments on landfill operating lease contracts, or working capital, or to react to changes in our industry or to the economy generally. Because these measures are not calculated by all companies in the same fashion, they may not be comparable to similarly titled measures reported by other companies.Casella Waste Systems, Inc., headquartered in Rutland, Vermont, provides solid waste management services consisting of collection, transfer, disposal, and recycling services primarily in the eastern United States.For further information, contact Ned Coletta, director of investor relations at (802) 772-2239, or visit the Company’s website at http://www.casella.com(link is external).The Company will host a conference call to discuss these results on Thursday, December 4, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. ET. Individuals interested in participating in the call should dial (877) 675-4751 at least 10 minutes before start time. The call will also be webcast; to listen, participants should visit Casella Waste Systems’ website at http://www.casella.com(link is external) and follow the appropriate link to the webcast. A replay of the call will be available on the company’s website, or by calling 719-457-0820 or 888-203-1112 (conference code #4859748), until 11:59 p.m. ET on Thursday, December 11, 2008.Safe Harbor StatementCertain matters discussed in this press release are “forward-looking statements” intended to qualify for the safe harbors from liability established by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements can generally be identified as such by the context of the statements, including words such as the company “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “plans,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “intends,” “estimates” and other similar expressions, whether in the negative or affirmative. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts and projections about the industry and markets in which we operate and management’s beliefs and assumptions. We cannot guarantee that we actually will achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in the forward-looking statements made. Such forward-looking statements, and all phases of our operations, involve a number of risks and uncertainties, any one or more of which could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in our forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include or relate to, among other things: we may be unable to reduce costs or increase revenues sufficiently to achieve estimated EBITDA and other targets; landfill operations and permit status may be affected by factors outside our control, continuing weakness in general economic conditions and in the commodities markets and poor weather conditions may affect our revenues; we may be required to incur capital expenditures in excess of our estimates; and fluctuations in the commodity pricing of our recyclables may make it more difficult for us to predict our results of operations or meet our estimates. There are a number of other important risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements. These additional risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, those detailed in Item 1A, “Risk Factors” in our Form 10-K for the year ended April 30, 2008. We do not necessarily intend to update publicly any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. CASELLA WASTE SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS Unaudited (In thousands, except amounts per share) Three Months Ended Six Months Ended ———————— ———————— October 31, October 31, October 31, October 31, 2007 2008 2007 2008 ———– ———– ———– ———–Revenues $ 150,483 $ 157,538 $ 299,009 $ 315,442Operating expenses: Cost of operations 95,621 103,728 192,525 208,170 General and administration 18,898 18,299 36,766 36,739 Depreciation and amortization 20,136 19,505 40,044 38,975 ———– ———– ———– ———– 134,655 141,532 269,335 283,884 ———– ———– ———– ———–Operating income 15,828 16,006 29,674 31,558Other expense/(income), net: Interest expense, net (1) 10,785 10,253 21,399 20,227 Loss from equity method investments 1,487 1,045 3,638 2,173 Other (income) expense 35 (64) (2,360) (152) ———– ———– ———– ———– 12,307 11,234 22,677 22,248 ———– ———– ———– ———–Income from continuing operations before income taxes and discontinued operations 3,521 4,772 6,997 9,310Provision (benefit) for income taxes (416) 2,706 714 5,023 ———– ———– ———– ———–Income from continuing operations before discontinued operations 3,937 2,066 6,283 4,287Discontinued Operations: Loss from discontinued operations, net of income taxes (2) (3) (4) (670) – (1,274) (11) Loss on disposal of discontinued operations, net of income taxes (2) (4) (437) – (437) (34) ———– ———– ———– ———–Net income available to common stockholders $ 2,830 $ 2,066 $ 4,572 $ 4,242 =========== =========== =========== ===========Common stock and common stock equivalent shares outstanding, assuming full dilution 25,652 25,745 25,592 25,720 =========== =========== =========== ===========Net income per common share $ 0.11 $ 0.08 $ 0.18 $ 0.17 =========== =========== =========== =========== ———– ———– ———– ———–EBITDA (6) $ 35,964 $ 35,511 $ 69,718 $ 70,533 =========== =========== =========== =========== CASELLA WASTE SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS Unaudited (In thousands) April 30, October 31, ASSETS 2008 2008 ———– ———–CURRENT ASSETS: Cash and cash equivalents $ 2,814 $ 3,110 Restricted cash 95 96 Accounts receivable – trade, net of allowance for doubtful accounts 62,233 66,222 Other current assets 30,343 32,206 ———– ———–Total current assets 95,485 101,634Property, plant and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation 488,028 501,263Goodwill 179,716 179,930Intangible assets, net 2,608 2,680Restricted cash 13,563 13,602Investments in unconsolidated entities 44,617 41,832Other non-current assets 12,070 15,515 ———– ———–Total assets $ 836,087 $ 856,456 =========== =========== LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITYCURRENT LIABILITIES: Current maturities of long-term debt $ 2,758 $ 2,002 Accounts payable 51,731 47,340 Other accrued liabilities 58,335 47,512 ———– ———–Total current liabilities 112,824 96,854Long-term debt, less current maturities 559,227 562,280Financing lease obligations – 11,674Other long-term liabilities 39,354 48,406Stockholders’ equity 124,682 137,242 ———– ———–Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity $ 836,087 $ 856,456 =========== =========== CASELLA WASTE SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS Unaudited (In thousands) Six Months Ended ———————— October 31, October 31, 2007 2008 ———– ———–Cash Flows from Operating Activities:Net income $ 4,572 $ 4,242Loss from discontinued operations, net 1,274 11Loss on disposal of discontinued operations, net 437 34Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities – Gain on sale of equipment (418) (577) Depreciation and amortization 40,045 38,975 Depletion of landfill operating lease obligations 3,348 3,520 Income from assets under contractual obligation (1,367) (114) Preferred stock dividend 1,038 – Amortization of premium on senior notes (307) (331) Maine Energy settlement (2,142) – Loss from equity method investments 3,638 2,173 Stock-based compensation 505 954 Excess tax benefit on the exercise of stock options (16) (157) Deferred income taxes 691 4,647 Changes in assets and liabilities, net of effects of acquisitions and divestitures (15,988) (14,160) ———– ———– 29,027 34,930 ———– ———– Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities 35,310 39,217 ———– ———–Cash Flows from Investing Activities: Acquisitions, net of cash acquired (93) (458) Additions to property, plant and equipment – growth (7,965) (8,232) – maintenance (35,025) (29,964) Payments on landfill operating lease contracts (2,413) (1,825) Proceeds from divestitures – 670 Other 2,554 (1,501) ———– ———– Net Cash Used In Investing Activities (42,942) (41,310) ———– ———–Cash Flows from Financing Activities: Proceeds from long-term borrowings 221,605 60,000 Principal payments on long-term debt (149,468) (59,104) Redemption of Series A redeemable, convertible preferred stock (75,056) – Proceeds from exercise of stock options 286 1,289 Excess tax benefit on the exercise of stock options 16 157 ———– ———– Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Financing Activities (2,617) 2,342 ———– ———–Cash Provided by Discontinued Operations 51 47 ———– ———–Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (10,198) 296Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period 12,366 2,814 ———– ———–Cash and cash equivalents, end of period $ 2,168 $ 3,110 =========== =========== CASELLA WASTE SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Unaudited (In thousands)Note 1: The Company’s Series A redeemable, convertible preferred stock (“Series A preferred”) contained a mandatory redemption provision effective August 11, 2007. As the Company did not anticipate that the Series A preferred would be converted to Class A Common Stock by the redemption date, the Company reflected the redemption value of the Series A preferred as a current liability. Consistent with this presentation, the Company recorded the Series A preferred dividend as interest expense in the three and six months ended October 31, 2007. The Series A preferred was redeemed effective August 11, 2007 at an aggregate redemption price of $75,057.Note 2: The Company divested its Buffalo, N.Y. transfer station, hauling operation and related equipment during the quarter ended October 31, 2007. The transaction required discontinued operations treatment under SFAS No. 144, therefore the operating results of these operations have been reclassified from continuing to discontinued operations for the three and six months ended October 31, 2007. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, the Company recorded a loss from discontinued operations (net of tax) of ($273) and ($810), respectively. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, the Company recorded a loss on disposal of discontinued operations (net of tax) of ($437).Note 3: The Company terminated its operation of MTS Environmental, a soils processing operation in the quarter ended April 30, 2008. The transaction required discontinued operations treatment under SFAS No. 144, therefore the operating results of this operation have been reclassified from continuing to discontinued operations for the three and six months ended October 31, 2007. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, the Company recorded a loss from discontinued operations (net of tax) of ($478) and ($650), respectively.Note 4: The Company divested its FCR Greenville operation in the quarter ended July 31, 2008. The transaction required discontinued operations treatment under SFAS No. 144, therefore the operating results of this operation have been reclassified from continuing to discontinued operations for the three and six months ended October 31, 2007. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007 and 2008, the Company recorded a gain /(loss) from discontinued operations (net of tax) of $81, $0, $186 and ($11), respectively. For the six months ended October 31, 2008, the Company recorded a loss on disposal of discontinued operations (net of tax) of ($34).Note 5: Return on Net Assets, (RONA), is defined as twelve months of operating income (excluding all unusual or non-recurring items) divided by the average for the five quarter-ends, commencing on the day preceding such twelve-month period, of the sum of working capital (net of cash) plus the net book value of property, plant and equipment plus goodwill and net intangible assets.Note 6: Non – GAAP Financial MeasuresIn addition to disclosing financial results prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), we also disclose earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, (EBITDA) and free cash flow, which are non-GAAP measures.These measures are provided because we understand that certain investors use this information when analyzing the financial position of the solid waste industry, including us. Historically, these measures have been key in comparing operating efficiency of publicly traded companies within the industry, and assist investors in measuring our ability to meet capital expenditures, payments on landfill operating lease contracts and working capital requirements. For these reasons, we utilize these non-GAAP metrics to measure our performance at all levels. EBITDA and free cash flow are not intended to replace “Net cash provided by operating activities”, which is the most comparable GAAP financial measure. Moreover, these measures do not necessarily indicate whether cash flow will be sufficient for such items as working capital, payments on landfill operating lease contracts or capital expenditures, or to react to changes in our industry or to the economy generally. Because these measures are not calculated by all companies in the same fashion, they may not be comparable to similarly titled measures reported by other companies. Following is a reconciliation of EBITDA to Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities: Three Months Ended Six Months Ended —————— —————— October October October October 31, 31, 31, 31, 2007 2008 2007 2008 ——– ——– ——– ——–Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities $ 15,078 $ 19,430 $ 35,310 $ 39,217Changes in assets and liabilities, net of effects of acquisitions and divestitures 11,232 7,149 15,988 14,160Deferred income taxes 165 (2,212) (691) (4,647)Stock-based compensation (289) (565) (505) (954)Excess tax benefit on the exercise of stock options 16 126 16 157Provision (benefit) for income taxes (416) 2,706 714 5,023Interest expense, net 10,785 10,253 21,399 20,227Preferred stock dividend (113) – (1,038) -Amortization of premium on senior notes 156 167 307 331Depletion of landfill operating lease obligations (1,491) (1,797) (3,348) (3,520)Income from assets under contractual obligation 629 25 1,367 114Gain on sale of equipment 177 293 418 577Other (income) expense, net 35 (64) (219) (152) ——– ——– ——– ——–EBITDA $ 35,964 $ 35,511 $ 69,718 $ 70,533 ======== ======== ======== ======== CASELLA WASTE SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES Unaudited (In thousands) Following is a reconciliation of Free Cash Flow to Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities: Three Months Ended Six Months Ended —————— —————— October October October October 31, 31, 31, 31, 2007 2008 2007 2008 ——– ——– ——– ——–EBITDA $ 35,964 $ 35,511 $ 69,718 $ 70,533Add (deduct): Cash interest (14,471) (14,618) (19,154) (20,463) Capital expenditures (20,642) (15,767) (42,990) (38,196) Cash taxes (1,459) (13) (1,770) (258) Depletion of landfill operating lease obligations 1,491 1,797 3,348 3,520 Change in working capital, adjusted for non-cash items (2,886) (743) (10,303) (10,778) ——– ——– ——– ——–FREE CASH FLOW (2,003) 6,167 (1,151) 4,358Add (deduct): Capital expenditures 20,642 15,767 42,990 38,196 Other (3,561) (2,504) (6,529) (3,337) ——– ——– ——– ——–Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities $ 15,078 $ 19,430 $ 35,310 $ 39,217 ======== ======== ======== ======== CASELLA WASTE SYSTEMS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES SUPPLEMENTAL DATA TABLES (Unaudited) (In thousands)Amounts of the Company’s total revenues attributable to services providedare as follows: Three Months Ended Six Months Ended October 31, October 31, ——————- ——————- 2007 2008 2007 2008 ——— ——— ——— ———Collection $ 69,178 $ 70,094 $ 138,331 $ 141,422Landfill / disposal facilities 28,966 30,866 58,169 59,909Transfer 7,691 8,717 15,038 17,920Recycling 44,648 47,861 87,471 96,191 ——— ——— ——— ———Total revenues $ 150,483 $ 157,538 $ 299,009 $ 315,442 ========= ========= ========= =========Components of revenue growth for the three months ended October 31, 2008compared to the three months ended October 31, 2007: Percentage ———-Solid Waste Operations (1) Price 3.4% Volume -2.2% Commodity price and volume 0.2% ———-Total growth – Solid Waste Operations 1.4% ==========FCR Operations (1) Price 13.0% Volume 1.2% ———-Total growth – FCR Operations 14.2% ==========Rollover effect of acquisitions (2) 0.7%Total revenue growth (2) 4.7%(1) – Calculated as a percentage of segment revenues.(2) – Calculated as a percentage of total revenues.Solid Waste Internalization Rates by Region: Three Months Ended Six Months Ended October 31, October 31, —————— —————last_img read more

first_imgGovernor Douglas today congratulated AirBoss, a manufacturer of rubber protective gear, after they were authorized for over $243,000 in Vermont Employment Growth Incentives (VEGI).  AirBoss plans to locate a manufacturing facility in Milton, Vermont and create over 30 jobs over the next two years. In April, Governor Douglas and a team of local, state and federal economic development officials met with AirBoss executives to outline a package of supports and incentives.  In May, the company received Initial Approval of VEGI incentives. The state also committed employee training funds through the Vermont Training Program and help from the Procurement Technical Assistance Center.  And at its recent meeting, the Vermont Economic Progress Council gave final approval to a VEGI application from AirBoss Defense for incentives totaling up to $243,279. “I am pleased to welcome AirBoss to Vermont,” Governor Douglas said.  “While there is a lot more work to do to help our state rebound from this recession, this announcement is a small step in the right direction.”AirBoss-Defense is a world leader in the design, manufacture and sale of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) protective wear, including gloves, footwear and respiratory protection (gas masks). The company had considered several locations for their capacity expansion, including a facility in North Carolina.AirBoss made the decision to locate in Vermont and will open a 20,000 square foot facility, reutilizing a building in the Catamount Industrial Park. The company will invest close to $2 million in equipment and renovations and expects to start preliminary packing and shipping from the facility late this year. By early 2010, AirBoss intends to have four injection presses manufacturing CBRN gloves, creating between 20-30 jobs by 2011. “I am very pleased that AirBoss chose Vermont over other options,” the Governor said. “Programs like VEGI and the Vermont Training Program certainly make us more competitive and can mean the difference between an employer creating jobs in Vermont or elsewhere.”Under reforms proposed by Governor Jim Douglas in 2006 and passed by the General Assembly, the VEGI economic incentives are authorized based on potential job creation and capital investments that must occur before the company earns the incentives and then the company receives incentive installments over a period of years. Companies are eligible to earn the job creation incentives only if they meet and maintain payroll, employment and capital investment targets each year.The Council approves applications after reviewing nine program guidelines and applying a rigorous cost-benefit analysis which show that because of the economic activity that will be generated by the projects, even after payment of the incentives the State will realize a minimum net increase in tax revenues.  The Council also determines that the projects would not occur or would occur in a significantly different and less desirable manner if not for the incentives being authorized.The Vermont Economic Progress Council is an independent board consisting of nine Vermont citizens appointed by the Governor that considers applications to the state’s economic incentive programs.  It is attached to the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development, whose mission is to help Vermonters improve their quality of life and build strong communities.The company will partner with the Vermont Department of Labor to hold a job fair at their Burlington office on Tuesday, October 6, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Wednesday, October 7, 9:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. For information on the job fair, contact Melanie Langevin, Vermont Department of Labor Burlington Office: melanie.langevin@state.vt.us(link sends e-mail) or (802)524-7932, or Mrs. Barbara Lee, Human Resources Manager, AirBoss Defense, blee@airboss.ca(link sends e-mail). www.airbossofamerica.com(link is external)Source: Governor’s office. 9.25.2009 ###last_img read more

first_imgThis year, Bruegger’s also asked its guests where they most enjoy their treats. The round up:Back at the office: 31.8 percentAt home: 21.3 percentAt Bruegger’s, with family or friends: 13.8 percent and 12.9 percent, respectively.In the car, during my commute: 11.9 percentTaking advantage of the free Wi-Fi at Bruegger’s: 8.3 percent Bruegger’s Bagels, Inc,Tuesday, February 8th, Burlington-based Bruegger’s Bagels, with 300 locations across the US, will celebrate National Bagel Day by offering three free bagels to its guests. (A coupon is required and can be accessed by “liking” Bruegger’s Facebook page.)Along with National Bagel Day (celebrated nationally on February 9), the month also marks Bruegger’s anniversary. In February 1983, it opened its first bakery in Troy, New York, offering fresh-baked bagels all day. To bring attention to the month – and delicious, fresh-baked bagels – Bruegger’s asked more than 150,000 bagel fans, through email and Facebook, to name their favorite bagel combinations and where they like to eat the perfect, fresh-from-the-oven delight. Bagel fans clamored to offer their opinion (and get a coupon!) — nearly 40,000 bagel-lovers responded to the survey and Bruegger’s Facebook page added thousands of fans. Survey results are below.In the category of favorite bagel flavor, for the second year in a row, the Everything bagel was the winner edging out the Asiago Parmesan bagel by a slight margin. The stats:Everything Bagel: 36.3 percent of respondents chose this flavor as their favorite.Asiago Parmesan: 35.6 percent like it cheesy.Cinnamon-Raisin: 23.5 percent of respondents like it fruity.Cinnamon-Sugar: 21.7 percent like it sweet.Plain: 20.9 percent of respondents are purists.Sesame: 19.9 percent of respondents liked bagels on the seedy side.In the category of favorite bagel topping, the winners are:Plain cream cheese: 24.6 percent like it plain.Light cream cheese: 18.9 percent keep it light.Honey walnut cream cheese: 16.4 percent were nutty for honey walnut.Butter: 15.5 percent want to ‘stick’ to the basics.Garden Veggie: 12.8 percent like to eat their veggies. “Today, Bruegger’s offers many delicious breakfast and lunch options,” said James Greco, Bruegger’s CEO. “But we still take pride in making fresh-baked bagels all day, every day, and are pleased to share the centuries-old, time-tested tradition with our guests.”In 2010, Bruegger’s sold 89 million bagels. Topping all those bagels was more than 2.6 million pounds of cream cheese. Nationally, Americans eat an estimated 3 billion bagels annually, an average of about 11 per person, according to the New York Times. Bruegger’s is also credited with creating the world’s largest bagel on August 27, 2004. The oversized bagel weighed in at 868 pounds and required 1,100 pounds of dough, 900 gallons of water and a bake time of 10 hours.About Bruegger’s Enterprises, Inc.Bruegger’s Enterprises, Inc., an affiliate of Sun Capital Partners, Inc., is a leader in the fast casual restaurant segment. In 300 locations in 26 states, the District of Columbia and Toronto, Bruegger’s is famous for genuine New York-style bagels baked fresh throughout the day. Guests can also chose a variety of menu items that include unique cream cheese flavors, breakfast sandwiches, hand-tossed salads, hearty soups, sandwiches, panini and desserts, with a frequently changing menu reflecting seasonal and geographical specialties. Founded in 1983, Bruegger’s is headquartered in Burlington, Vermont and supports its neighbors in every community it serves. For more information, please visitwww.brueggers.com(link is external) or become a fan on Facebook at www.facebook.com/brueggers(link is external).This press release was issued through 24-7PressRelease.com.  For further information, visithttp://www.24-7pressrelease.com(link is external).SOURCE Bruegger’s BURLINGTON, Vt., Feb. 7, 2011 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

first_img### The US Department of Education today announced that the Vermont Family Network will receive $189,052 in a special education Parent Training and Information Center (PTI) grant to help parents ensure that their children receive a free, appropriate public education as guaranteed by federal law.  The Education Department will award a total of $5.3 million for 2011 to operate 19 special education PTI centers in 13 states and Puerto Rico.                       ‘Parent Centers help families better understand their child’s disability and can often connect them to important local, state and national resources,’ said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.  ‘These centers will play a vital role in empowering parents and families to learn about appropriate early interventions and special education services.’             Parent information centers provide parents with the training and information they need to work with special education professionals in meeting the early intervention and special needs of children with disabilities.  Many parent information centers work closely with state and local school systems to engage parents in working collaboratively to improve outcomes for students with disabilities.             For a list of Education Department-funded special education parent information and training centers, visit www.parentcenternetwork.org(link is external).             The following is a list of the grants the Department announced and the states or audience that they will serve, including the contact information for the local project directors and the amount of each award:             Parent Training and Information Centers: ·         AK ‘ Stone Soup Group, Kelly Donnelly, kellyd@stonesoupgroup.org(link sends e-mail), $263,115·         AL ‘ Alabama Parent Education Center, Jeana Winter, jwinter@alabamaparentcenter.com(link sends e-mail), $291,281·         CO ‘ PEAK Parent Center, Julie Harmon, Jharmon@peakparent.org(link sends e-mail), $279,445·         FL Region 1 ‘ Florida Network on Disabilities, Nicole Brown, Nicole@fndfl.org(link sends e-mail), $169,645·         FL Region 2 ‘ Central Florida Parent Center, Eileen Gilley, Eileen@cflparents.org(link sends e-mail), $491,973·         FL Region 3 ‘ Florida Network on Disabilities, Margarita Montalvo, margarita@fndfl.org(link sends e-mail), $330,801·         KY ‘ Kentucky Special Parent Involvement Network, Paulette Logsdon, paulette@kyspin.com(link sends e-mail), $258,607·         MD ‘ The Parents’ Place of Maryland, Josie Thomas, josie@ppmd.org(link sends e-mail), $319,295·         ME ‘ Maine Parent Federation, Janice LaChance, jlachance@mpf.org(link sends e-mail), $188,545·         ND ‘ Pathfinder Parent Center, Cathy Haarstad, ptidirector@srt.com(link sends e-mail), $204,947·         NE ‘ PTI Nebraska, Glenda Davis, gdavis@pti-nebraska.org(link sends e-mail), $224,894·         NV ‘ Nevada P.E.P., Karen Taycher, ktaycher@nvpep.org(link sends e-mail), $202,813·         NY Region 1 ‘ Advocates for Children of New York, Anna Espada, aespada@advocatesforchildren.org(link sends e-mail), $210,813·         NY Region 1 ‘ Resources for Children with Special Needs, Rachel Howard, rhoward@resourcesnyc.org(link sends e-mail), $210,813·         NY Region 1 ‘ Singeria, Godfrey Rivera, grivera@sinergiany.org(link sends e-mail), $210,813·         NY Region 2 ‘ The Advocacy Center, Barb Klein, klein@advocacycenter.com(link sends e-mail), $524,874·         PR ‘ APNI, Mariel Cabrera, mcabrera@apnipr.org(link sends e-mail), $271,950·         VT ‘ Vermont Family Network, Christine Kilpatrick, christine.kilpatrick@vtfn.org(link sends e-mail), $189,052·         WI ‘ Wisconsin FACETS, Jan Serak, jserak@wifacets.org(link sends e-mail), $438,408last_img read more